People who live in Mississippi have witnessed vehicle manufacturers promoting the inclusion of many new and advanced safety features in their newer model vehicles. From systems designed to alert drivers to possible hazards to systems that are capable of taking action without a driver’s input, there is a plethora of new options available that are all designed to prevent accidents and improve safety on the road.

The Washington Post recently reported on some of the latest traffic fatality statistics based on data provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Much of the news is good and would make it seem that efforts to boost safety seem to be working. The number of people killed in automobile crashes in 2018 dropped 2.4% from the previous year. Between January and June of 2019, vehicular fatalities are down another 3.4%.

However, the news is not all so rosy. Deaths among bicyclists and pedestrians are rising. In 2018 alone, people on bikes and on foot accounted for 20% of all who were killed in motor vehicle accidents. Pedestrian deaths seem to have been increasing steadily for a while now. In 2008, foot traffic comprised 12% of all vehicular fatalities. in 2018, pedestrians alone accounted for 17% of all deaths on U.S. roads.

The safety of pedestrians and bicyclists appears to be under siege predominately in cities and urban areas, perhaps as more people look for alternative means to cars for their daily commutes. Fatalities were also particularly troublesome during dark hours, which can be more extensive in the fall and winter seasons when the days are shorter.